Redefining Mission

Today’s chat with Wan Yueh reveals a new perspective to think about God’s call for my life at this current moment.

What if, my mission is here and now?
What if, I’m right where God has called me to be?
What if, ‘here’ is the ‘there’ that I had imagined?

Instead of seeking to go, be. Be, right here, right now.
Instead of doing, focus on my being.
Cultivate a personal intimacy and reliance on God: less of myself, more of God, even when it doesn’t look like what I had imagined.

My mission field looks like this right now:

  •  Private tuition students
    1. J
    2. R
    3. G
    4. M
  • Playground outreach kids
  • Building teams:
    1. Hope Tots
    2. El-Sadai
    3. Intercession

These are likely to last the entire year of 2017 — a year of focus and dedication to the work at hand.

Then I ask myself, what about my vocation (as in job)? Other than taking a pay from private tuition, what is God’s direction and leading for my career?

Vocation: what does it even mean?

screenshot-2016-11-20-15-40-19

Let’s study it in light of God’s word. Here are some notes from the study:

    1. Everyone is called to belong to Christ and to participate in his creative and redemptive work.
    2. Everyone is commanded to work to the degree they are able.
    3. God calls us to a whole life, not just to a job.
  • Work is not limited to paid work; the work God leads us to may be unpaid work
  • Any given activity could be work — paid or unpaid — for one person, and leisure for another
  • Even if God leads you to a particular job or profession, you will need to set limits to that work to make room for the other elements of God’s call or guidance in your life
  • The distinctive work of the Holy Spirit is to guide and empower people for the life and work to which God leads them
  • God has given everyone the ability to recognize something of what the world needs. He seems to expect us to notice it and get to work, rather than waiting for a special call from him. There is no biblical formula for translating the needs of the world into a precise job calling. That’s why you need to seek God’s guidance in the various forms of discernment available to you
  • Frederick Buechner writes: “The place God calls you to is where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.”
  • These three considerations — the needs of the world, your skills and gifts, and your truest desires — are guides, but they are not absolutes
  • Whatever your job, God’s gifts enable you to work for the common good, to find more contentment in your work, and to overcome or endure the negative aspects of your situation. Most importantly, God promises eventual liberation from work’s toil, sweaty labor, and thistles.
  • Your capabilities should grow with your experience in serving God. He may lead you to bigger tasks that require you to change jobs. “Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master” (Matthew 25:21)
  • In every job, you have at least some opportunity to meet people’s needs, to employ your gifts and skills, and to express — or discover — your deepest desires. Your decision every day to serve God today is more important than positioning yourself for the right job tomorrow
  • The true aim of work for the Christian is to serve the common good, not to advance his or her own interests. Over a lifetime, serving the common good comes far more from doing each day’s work to the best of your ability in Christ, than it does from finding the best job for yourself

Further reading for the next time:

  1. More on Vocation
  2. Discerning God’s Guidance to a Particular Work
  3. Balancing Rest and Work
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